Tag Archives for " advertising "

March 13, 2017

The Gatekeepers In The Way Of Getting Your Music On Commercials

More and more artists, bands and songwriters are interested in getting their music placed in a commercial, but unfortunately it’s not getting any easier. That’s because a wide array of gatekeepers stand in the way of any placement. A great article from Jordan Passman combined with the following infographic outlines just where the gatekeepers lie.

Music Gatekeepers infographic

As you can see from the infographic, there are two ways to get your music placed in advertising – either through an agency or directly to the advertisers. Going through an ad agency means that there’s a wide variety of people within that company that must give approval first before the advertiser even gets to hear the song. These include the agency music producer, spot producer, maybe the art director, the creative directors of the brand team, and the agency account team. They may go through as many as 300 songs before choosing one to send off the client for approval.

The song must then make it’s way through the advertiser’s junior and senior client teams, the brand marketing team and then the chief marketing officer or even the CEO. If the commercial tests well from there, it goes on air. If not, it’s back to the drawing board.

If you can skip the agency, the number of gatekeepers can be decreased by half, but it may just bypass the lowest execs on the totem pole. Regardless of how the song makes it onto a commercial, there’s a lot of many to be made for the songwriter, but the journey to get their is still a long road.

Music Industry News Roundup For The Week Of 2/3/17

Music Industry News Roundup Here’s the Music Industry News Roundup for the week of February 3rd, 2017. This has been a big week for social media changes, but there are still some interesting record label-related developments. Let’s get into it.

Sony earned $1.2 billion from streaming last year. It still made more from physical sales, but not by much.

Streaming is changing music consumption, but is that good? Well, the measurements are no different, and this article doesn’t think they’re as fair and equal as they should be.

Investors are putting more money in the music business. That’s because they believe it’s finally coming back, and owning music publishing is an appreciating asset (which it’s always proven to be).

Vevo has now reached 100 million users. The music video network partially owned my Universal Music was seen by 43% of all viewers who watched YouTube in December. The funny thing is, most of them aren’t even aware that they’re watching it.

Speaking of Vevo, MBW thinks Facebook should poach it from YouTube. The article says that it could make approximately $32 billion a year if it did, which sounds a bit far-fetched to me. Still a good idea though.

Soundcloud’s getting deeper into advertising. Users don’t want to hear this, but the company is trying to increase revenue to look like a better acquisition target.

Snapchat is adding augmented reality. A new lense will allow users to identify environmental elements and superimpose digital effects on top. It’s still experimental so we won’t see it for a while, but it’s cool that it’s in development.

Hulu launched its virtual reality show On Stage. You need the service’s VR app in order to get the full effect, but it’s good to see the technology getting off the ground in music.

Facebook is going to start paying for videos. Both up front and revenue sharing from ads will make video content creators happy. It’s also a shot across the bow of YouTube.

People are upset that Instagram now does groups of photos. They feel it’s trying to become all things to all people and losing its focus.

That’s the Music News Roundup of what went on in the music industry last week. Have a great week ahead!

April 22, 2016

How Long Should Your Teaser Video Be?

Best teaser lengthMany artists and bands will post a teaser video of their album before it’s released, or as a brief sampler afterwards. The problem is that there’s several schools of thought on how long the teaser should be.

One school has it that shortest is best, since YouTube attention span is around 8 seconds. The second school says that you should make it as long as necessary to get the point across, even up to several minutes long.

It turns out that neither may be right. According to a study done by Think With Google, good old fashioned 30 second ads performed far better than either 15 or 60 second ones when it came to people viewing it all the way through. This allowed the viewer to get more detail about the product without the dreaded viewer fatigue.

This contradicts what happens on television, where 15 second ads are up to 75% more effective (and cheaper) than their longer counterparts. No surprise since online advertising has proven to be substantially different because of its random access nature.

The bottom line is that 30 seconds is a sweet spot in that it’s neither too long nor too short, giving you enough time to get the point across while the viewer doesn’t feel like she has to sit through too much information.