Tag Archives for " EDM "

Music Industry News Roundup For The Week Of 12/23/16

Music Industry News Roundup Here’s the Music Industry News Roundup for the week of December 23rd, 2016. Surprisingly enough, there’s a lot of music business-related and social news this week, despite the Holiday season.

iHeart Radio is in big financial trouble. Radio is dying in general, and a few years ago when the hedge funds bought in they didn’t realize that fact. The company probably won’t change much because of the problems (at least in the short term) but the investors will take a haircut soon.

Apple Music is trying to become more than a streaming platform. It’s now more of a quasi-label, offering lots of promotion in addition to streaming. This interview with two Apple Music execs is revealing.

Not to be outdone, YouTube is quietly beefing up promotion for some artists as well. Not that it helps the indie artist much, but you can see where all this going. [subscription required]

There are indie artists making it on streaming alone though. Yes, it’s not only possible, but this article outline a number of indie artists in different countries with massive streaming numbers.

The VR revolution is here, but it has yet to break with consumers. Many think that this will change in 2017, but the consumer uptake so far is disappointing, and understandable.

Dance music hit a big speed bump in 2016. This article outlines 11 things that broke the hearts of EDM aficionados.

The album cycle is pretty much dying, with Drake the perfect example of the new singles paradigm. But playlisting plays a big part in streaming success as well, and this interview with Spotify’s Troy Carter is enlightening.

Streaming is changing music again, finally making the Long Tail concept viable. This Harvard Business Review article shows how streaming is turning the music industry into a singles business, and is killing the album. Oh, and more people are listening to music other than the hits along the way.

Streaming apps aren’t keeping pace, and user experience is the thing to concentrate on. Industry analyst Mark Mulligan makes a number of good points about music falling behind in engagement to non-music apps like Snapchat, Instagram and Buzzfeed.

Twitter is toast, according to one financial analyst. The company is experiencing plateaued growth and a brain drain, and the stock is expected to take a dive soon.

Finally, Facebook is correcting its metrics for ad reach, streaming reactions, Likes and Shares. It looks like the numbers we were seeing weren’t really true after all. If you advertise on Facebook, you should read this article before placing another ad.

That’s the Music News Roundup of what went on in the music industry last week. Let’s see what next week brings.

Industry News Roundup For The Week Of 10/7/16

Music Industry News Roundup Here’s the music industry news roundup from the week of October 7th, 2016. There’s a little less on streaming this week for the first time in a while, but still lots to cover. Let’s get to it.

Music supervisors don’t think they’re hurting songwriters. I wrote about this last week and now a music sup responds. The bottom line is that if you change your music to please people you’re really compromising your art.

Americana music is being kept alive by the Brits. Is this the same thing that happened with Blues in the 1960’s happening all over again?

Spotify is launching in Japan, but it might not be successful. It’s a different music culture over there, and digital music still hasn’t caught on.

iHeart is looking for the casual music fan. It’s new streaming service is trying to stay out of the way of Spotify and Apple Music.

Streaming revenue is increasing for labels, but not so much for artists and songwriters. So what else is new? History repeats itself again.

Shazam is making a lot of money, but not from music. It’s the image and sound recognition technology that advertisers pay big bucks for.

Piracy isn’t new; we’ve been stealing music for a long time. Although this article outlines more recent instances, I can remember Rupert Perry telling me that EMI felt it was losing as much as 20% of its sales way back in the days of the reel-to-reel tape recorder.

It just might make sense for Spotify to purchase SoundCloud. Mostly because it gives new artists a way onto the platform without using an aggregator.

SiriusXM launches a talk show about music. It’s called Volume and has been dubbed “Sports talk for music.” I’ve waited a long time for this.

EDM is trying to expand to Asia. The genre is slowing elsewhere in the world, but Asia is still a big open market that promoters are keen to develop.

That’s the News Roundup of what went on in the music industry last week. Let’s see what next week brings.

Electronic Dance Music Still Has Room For Growth Despite Predictions

Andy_Moor_DJ_2010Andy_Moor_DJ_2010It wasn’t that long ago when it looked like electronic dance music, or EDM, might be the savior of the music business, thanks to an impressive growth rate of 54% over the course of just three years. With overall CD and download sales slowing down, and streaming paid subscribers not increasing as fast as the industry expected, EDM looked like it was the record label’s shining star when it came to fertile new sales ground. The problem is, in the last year, the upswing has slowed to just 3.5%, but that doesn’t mean there still isn’t room for growth in the genre.

According to the IMS Business Report 2016, total EDM sales went from $4.5 billion in 2012/13 to $6.9 billion in 2014/15. In the past year, that growth slowed by quite a bit, increasing by just $200 million, which has a many in the music industry thinking doom and gloom again.

That outlook may be a bit premature, however, because even though the U.S. market seems to have matured, other high-potential markets are only now in the early stages of development. Cuba, South America, Vietnam, the Philippines, and China have all seen huge electronic dance music festivals and clubs launched this year alone. In fact, nine clubs out of 20 new entries into the DJ Mag Top 100 Clubs are in Asia, with four in China, and three in Jakarta. Even a club from the UAE was listed.

One of the reasons for all the optimism comes from the fact that out of all genres of music (and there are a lot), electronic dance music is one of the most transportable. Since it’s mostly instrumental (even if there’s a vocal, the lyrics often don’t play a big part in song), there’s no language barrier between countries as a result. This means that even when the genre has topped out in the major developed countries, growth can still continue in smaller and upstart markets, sort of like what happened with American jazz music of the 1950s and 60s.

While it might seem like most of the revenue growth is coming from live events, that’s not entirely true. Song streams and downloads play a significant part of the genre’s revenue makeup.

For instance, streams increased 33% in the U.S. last year to 15 billion, although that figure is somewhat tempered by the fact that album and digital track sales and genre market share fell. In the UK, however, streaming growth grew at a faster rate than any other genre in 2015, and EDM remained in the top three formats in terms of sales there. In France, a third of the radio stations dedicated more than 10% of their output to Dance tracks in Q1 2015, showing the format is alive and well there too. In fact, Europe in general loves the genre, since figures indicate that at least 1 in 7 people have recently attended an EDM event. [Read more on Forbes]

(Photo: Andymoore1980 via WikiPedia)

EDM Is Slowing Down

EDM is slowing downWe’ve all seen clubs and restaurants that were white hot for a while and suddenly petered out after the sheen had worn off. That’s what’s happening with EDM at the moment as the scene is slowly winding down on a number of fronts.

Although some big festivals like Ultra Music can still command large crowds, they’re not the instant sellouts that they once were. In fact, many formerly successful festivals like TomorrowWorld have been cancelled this year.

Why is this happening? There are a number of reasons why the scene is said to have peaked (some say back in 2013).

  • For one thing, EDM is a victim of its own success, with entrance, VIP and bottle prices now beyond what the normal fan can handle.
  • There are fewer South American high-rollers to prop the clubs up as unfavorable exchange rates and country economics have kept them at home.
  • Soaring DJ fees (as high as $400,000 per night) have also made it impossible for many clubs to continue.
  • The “show” that most DJ’s put are is basically the same, and is pretty much limited by the genre and environment. People that used to love EDM are now looking for something new.
  • Many are also tired of the house music genre that’s at the heart of EDM.

Both Las Vegas and South Beach, the respective ground zero for the genre, have seen mass club closings in the last year, and SFX Entertainment, who bet heavily on investing in EDM, has declared bankruptcy.

It looks like we’re ready for a new trend. Do you see it on the horizon?