Tag Archives for " engagement "

How To Measure Online Audience Engagement

Measuring engagementWhen we think online audience engagement, we usually think of views or streams. There’s a lot more to it than that though, as this infographic from Statista shows how industry insiders evaluate true engagement.

As you can see, Shares are the #1 most valuable engagement element, closely followed by the actual amount of time users dwell on a piece. The number of comments is also high on the list, but page views and page visitors less so, mostly because many can be quick bounces that leave after a few seconds.

The whole idea is to post content that makes users want to watch or read all the way through, then share with their friends and maybe even leave a comment. While this can’t be done with every post, the more you do it, the more likely that you’ll have an energized following.

Infographic: How to Measure Audience Engagement Online? | Statista
You will find more statistics at Statista

May 27, 2016

5 Tips For Increasing YouTube Engagement

YouTube EngagementYouTube EngagementEven though Facebook is catching up, YouTube engagement is still a primary concern for every artist. Information is power, and some brand new data about viewership on YouTube help to maximize its usefulness as a promotional tool.

For instance, video length is one of the biggest deciding factors for engagement. Videos under one minute are watched to completion 80 percent of the time, while 2 to 3 minute clips have 60 percent retention and 5 to 10 minute videos are only completed 50 percent of the time. That said, the average time a user spends on YouTube has increased, as it’s now up to 39 minutes.

Subrat Kar, the founder of the video analytics service Vidooly, has 5 tips for increasing YouTube engagement.

1. Focus promotion on mobile viewers. 98% of millennials watch video on their smartphones, and 92% of mobile viewers share videos.

2. Post and share at an appropriate time. The peak time for viewing on the smartphone, tablet or computer is between noon and 5PM.

3. Create videos that appeal to audience passions and align with your channel’s brand. 67% of shoppers played a video with the idea of making a purchase and watched it at least 80% through. That means that a video introducing your latest merch or release can be very effective.

4. Increase shares and shelf life by embedding videos in emails. There’s a 96% increase in click through rate, 26% fewer people unsubscribe, and 19% more people open when the title contains the word “video.”

5. Collaborate with viewers and cultivate community. YouTube provides the option for crowdsources subtitles and closed captions in 60 different languages.

Remember that the average watch time for a video is 2.7 minutes. The longer a video drags on, the lower its retention, which is no surprise since the human attention span in 2015 was a mere 8.25 seconds (and 9 seconds for a goldfish).

YouTube is still the king of the mountain when it comes to video, so its best to pay attention to the latest statistics.

March 21, 2016

Labels Adapt To Music Without Sales

Record Label PromotionMajor record labels are are finally coming to grips with the fact that we’re going to be living in a streaming world where any sales are a bonus. That means their strategy is now changing from one of selling product to one of engagement, according to a great article on The Drum.

The article states that there’s now a rethink of how product should be marketed.

Instead of the short “release windows” of the past, labels are coming to realize that the more consumers are listening to an artist’s streams, the more money everyone is making. As a result, the marketing cycles are becoming much longer, creating a “continuous loop” that’s geared to keep people coming back to listen.

This movement is being spearheaded by Sony Music UK, but other labels are slowly adapting the strategy.

Sony began to look at other industries like traditional publishing and hotels to see how both are courting and keeping their customers, then incorporating that strategy to help increase engagement.

This can only be good for artists, who have long suffered from inadequate promotion when a song or album wasn’t an immediate hit.

In the past, there was still a chance that a record could catch fire if a radio station (no matter how obscure) would add the song to its playlist, but in these days of station groups, consultants, and less local radio, that’s more difficult than ever. Plus, radio is less and less relevant when there’s no product to sell, so any new ideas in music marketing is great news for every artist and label in our new Music 4.0 age.