Tag Archives for " live music "

December 13, 2016

Sphere Modeling Mic Creator Chris Townsend On My Latest Inner Circle Podcast

Chris TownsendWe’d all like to have a mic cabinet filled with the most coveted vintage mics, but few of us can afford even one of those beauties. That may all change thanks to the new generation of modeling microphones, which bring you an excellent rendition of the best of the best in vintage mics in one package at a reasonable price.

Chris Townsend is the creator of the Sphere L22 modeling mic, and he’s on this week’s podcast to tell us all about it, and why we should consider a modeler in the future.

I must tell you that his voice was recorded on one of his mics in the U47 mode, and it sounds fabulous, but you can hear it for yourself when you tune in.

On the intro I’ll look at how virtual reality may be a boon to live music, and the potential cyber-security risk facing us with our studio gear.

You can listen to it at bobbyoinnercircle.com, or via iTunesStitcher, Mixcloud or Google Play.

Virtual Reality And Live Music Seem Like A Marriage Made In Heaven

virtual reality live musicOne of the downsides of live music is that only so many people can experience it at any one time. Whether it’s a club, concert or festival, attendance is limited to only the people that are able to make it to the venue, even though many more may desire to do so. Live video feeds and broadcasts changed this somewhat, but haven’t caught on to the level that was expected, mostly because the experience is fairly limited from a viewership point of view. It’s not all that realistic, after all. This could all change thanks to virtual reality though, as was recently pointed out in an NBC post.

VR, even if it’s cheaply created and delivered, is a much more enjoyable experience as it gives you the feeling that you’re actually in the venue. Turn you head to either side and you see the people in the crowd. Turn to the rear and you see the bar. Turn forward left to right and you either see the individual band members on stage, or the expanse of the DJ booth. Look up and you see the ceiling, lighting and sound system. Look down and you may see a lighted dance floor. For all intense and purposes, you are there and you have the best seat in the house.

The picture portion of VR is way ahead of the audio however, which is the missing link in the experience. There’s not enough attention being paid to the this aspect and it’s the final piece of the puzzle for a truly live experience. The tools are available, but the integration with those high quality tools isn’t seamless at the moment, and it adds a level of expense that many club owners don’t want to absorb, although the bigger the venue, the less this becomes an issue.

Make no mistake about it, virtual reality may become a significant revenue source for both artists and venues in the future as soon as the kinks are worked out. That said, there’s a fear among venue owners that the experience can potentially be so good that it’s actually better than being present live in the venue. We’re not close to that yet, as VR is still in it’s infancy, but look for it to make its mark on live music in a big way in the near future.