Tag Archives for " Nielsen "

If You Want To Reach Music Fans, Go To Instagram

Instagram logoNielsen has just completed a study analyzing the habits and lifestyles of U.S. music listeners on Instagram, and the results show that if you want want to reach music lovers, that’s one of the best platforms to use for promotion.

What was determined? First of all, Instagram users are huge music fans, and show it with their wallets. They spend 42% more money on music and listen 30% more than the general population. In fact, the typical Instagram user spends a surprising $269 per year on music.

What do they listen to? 41% listen to pop/Top 40, 39% to rap and hip-hop, 33% to R&B, 30% to rock, 23% to country, and 13% to EDM.

When it comes to music consumption, a whopping 90% of Instagram users stream music, and they’re more than twice as likely to pay for it too. And where do they get it from? 49% get it from YouTube, 44% from Pandora (a surprise), and only 29% from Spotify. They are also 3 times more likely to use Soundcloud or Apple Music.

Instagram users are also frequent live events like concerts and clubs, and are especially drawn to a club with a DJ. What’s more, during live music event, Instagram is the #1 platform and is used 83% more for sharing with concertgoers, artists and fans than any other platforms. They’re also more likely to use smartphones for activities than the general population. This includes purchasing music that they hear at a concert, visiting a performer’s website or social presence, calling friends to let them hear the concert, or sharing videos of the event.

For sure, Instagram shouldn’t be the only social platform in your promotional arsenal, and you certainly can’t ignore the others even if most of your fans live here. That said, the study shows is that the platform can be very important for reaching either your current fans, or potential ones.

Music Industry News Roundup #5

Music Industry News Roundup Here’s the music industry news roundup from the last week. There’s much more diverse news than previous weeks, but streaming continues to dominate the conversation.

Taylor Swift is the highest earning celebrity. The thing is, she didn’t get that way from selling music. She learned early that it’s the brand that sells.

Elizabeth Warren has it in for music monopolies. She has her eye keenly on Apple, Google and Amazon. This is not the person to have angry with you, regardless how large the enterprise.

Spotify’s trying some hosted radio shows. It seems like Apple Music’s Beats 1 is making an impact, so Spotify’s trying something similar, but without the big name DJs.

Spotify looks to go public this year. In related news, 5 sources have stated that the company will file an IPO soon. I bet the investors are happy at the prospect of getting some money back, but what will the market say?

Sirius XM subscribers pass 30 million. Everyone thought that the satellite business was dying, but that’s not the case at all. You know what? It’s all about the programming (something that terrestrial radio should learn).

Pandora is teetering. The major shareholders aren’t happy and they’ve brought in a high-powered consultant to explore a sale.

Artists not seeing much from secondary ticketing. Not much of the money made by Stubhub, Viagogo or Ticketmaster seems to be making its way back into the pocketbooks of the artists. Isn’t this a bigger issue than YouTube royalty rates?

Selena Gomez social media posts are worth $550,000 a piece. Astonishing but apparently true, Ms Gomez ranks #1 with sponsors who are willing to pay to be included in her posts.

Nielsen’s mid-year charts. Drake, Adele, Rhianna dominate. No surprises here except for Bowie’s Blackstar being the #1 vinyl album so far (but with only 57,000 copies sold). Sales are still falling, with Adele’s 25 leading the pack with only 1.4 million in sales.

That’s the News Roundup of what went on in the music industry last week. Let’s see what next week brings.

Old Music Outsells New In 2015

Old Music outsells new musicNielsen’s latest music report is out and, as always, it’s very revealing about what we listen to in the U.S. Perhaps it’s biggest revelation is that, for the first time, old music (known as catalog sales) outsold new music in 2015.

Catalog is defined as a music release that’s more than 18 months old. Of course, we’re also talking about music sales and not streams, which is an entirely different matter.

That said, sales of older music came despite the huge sales numbers for Adele’s giant 25 album, which was only available for sale and not as a stream. The album went on to sell 7.2 million copies in the last 6 weeks of 2015 in the U.S. alone.

But lest you think that CDs are completely dead, 2015 saw 125 million of them sold for about $1.52 billion in revenue, which is still a huge amount of money.

And that’s only the CDs that were tallied by Soundscan. CDs sold privately on events and online aren’t counted.

Beyond that, there were 103 million digital albums downloaded, and 11.9 million vinyl albums sold.

As you can see on the chart on the left, catalog music leads over new music in all facets of sales. I guess the “Long Tail Theory” must be working.