Tag Archives for " Pexeso "

An Overview Of A Day On YouTube

YouTube A Day In The LIfeA recent look at a day in the life of YouTube by Pexeso is extremely illuminating. First of all, it’s not as music-centric as it was previously, with only 5% of its videos now dedicated to music. Those amounted to 11% of total views, which comes in 4th behind gaming, entertainment, and people and blogs. Another eye-opening stat is that more than 93% of the videos are in English, and that the 3 major labels rank 2, 3 and 4 among the number of take-down notices issued.

Here’s an overview of the data. You can find a very nice infographic here.

Brief overview of statistics of 1 YouTube day:

  • YouTube receives roughly 300,000 individual video uploads each day, amounting to 80k hours of video and 24TB of data.
  • 8am PST is the busiest time of day for video uploads, whereas 12:36am is the least busy. Approximately 10x more videos are uploaded during the busiest time comparing to the least busy.
  • The average video uploaded to YouTube is 15 minutes long and 86MB in size.
  • 93.5% of videos uploaded to YouTube are in English.
  • The People & Blogs category receives the highest volume of uploads, accounting for a whopping 41% of videos uploaded everyday, followed by Gaming (14%), Film & Action (10%) and Entertainment (8%).
  • Although the People & Blogs category accounts for the most video uploads each day, Gaming is king, receiving the most attention.
  • Static videos — typically spammy videos containing just a static image whose purpose is to lure people outside of YouTube — account for unbelievable 7.5% of all uploaded videos.

What happens to videos after they’re uploaded?

  • Only 35% of all videos uploaded will be claimed by rights holders. 26% will be monitored or monetized by the copyright holder; the remainder will be taken down.
  • A whopping 32% of all videos will end up removed within the first 24 hours.
  • 5% of videos will be deleted by users.
  • 18% will be removed because the user had their account terminated.
  • 9% will be taken down due to copyright infringement.
  • 0.4% of all videos are made private by the users in the first 24 hours.
  • 5% accounts that uploads videos in any given day get terminated for violating YouTube’s TOS.
  • Terminated accounts upload around 20% of all videos every day, 6x more than a typical account.

Any perceptions of YouTube as a platform that’s dominated by music are shattered by this study. Indeed, video does account for 74% of all Internet traffic, but music is just a small piece of it.

How Fan’s Video Copies Sold Adele’s “Hello”

Hello video copiesWe all know how powerful video can be when it comes to having a hit, but a recent analysis of Adele’s “Hello” by Pexeso really drives the point home that video copies play a huge part in fan awareness. The site tracked the hit song over a period of 101 days, starting on its October 22nd release date on YouTube, and found out a lot about the popularity of video on various social platforms.

  • First of all, more than 60,000 copies of “Hello” were found across eight popular social media platforms. 45% were published on YouTube, while Facebook accounted for 29% of copies, followed by Vine, which accounted for 12.9%.
  • Even though Facebook had far fewer copies published than YouTube, Facebook still garnered over 2x more video views than YouTube. According to the site, Facebook racked up an average of 73,083 views per video, whereas each YouTube video of the song amassed an average of 23,095 views per video . Vine actually ranked higher than YouTube, with an average of 49,904 views per video. Of course, as you’ve seen by my recent article on the subject, all platforms measure what a view is differently, with Facebook being particularly generous in that regard.
  • Facebook was the leader in terms of engagement though, with 41,436,124 cumulative likes and shares on all video copies, and 15,634,315 on the original. Believe it or not, Google+ came in at second place with 1,715,636 engagements on video copies and 1,496,299 on the original. While it may seem a little lopsided that copies of the song beat out the official uploaded song, remember that there were far more user-generated copies available. One thing here that was surprising is that copies of the music video received over 2.5x more engagement than the source video over the course of the survey.
  • Speaking of copies, the official video was copied and uploaded extremely fast. It took just 2 minutes and 7 seconds after “Hello’s” music video was published to Adele’s VEVO channel on YouTube for the first copy to appear on Facebook. It took slightly longer  for YouTube, at 3 minutes and 12 seconds later. 18 minutes and 48 seconds after its initial release, the first Vine clip of “Hello” surfaced.
  • Despite all you hear about YouTube and the record labels being tough on piracy, only 16.9%  of the 60,055 copies of “Hello” that were located were removed via takedown request. 36% of those takedowns came via YouTube, but they accounted for only 13% of the 27,033 total copies published to the site.

This is indeed a strange new video world we live in that’s asymmetrical in nature. It can’t be assumed that the results on one platform will be matched by another, or that one is better than another. One thing’s for sure, if the fans like your song or music video, it will for sure make it’s way onto every available social platform available.

[photograph: Egghead06 via Wikipedia]

Maybe YouTube Isn’t That Big For Music After All

YouTube FactsThe music industry has always operated under the premise that music content made up about 40% of YouTube’s traffic, a figure that has bothered everyone considering how little revenue it’s generated as a result. No comes data from Pexeso showing that figure may be way off.

The company found that music-related content on YouTube amount to just 4.3% of the the service’s total traffic. In contrast, gaming-related content accounts for 33.4% of the total, entertainment-focused content has an 18.9% chunk, and bloggers, and YouTube personalities have a 14.3% of the pie. .

What’s more, YouTube itself says that music is only worth 2.5% of its traffic and users spend only an hour a month watching music videos!

That said, there’s a lot of new YouTube data that’s both interesting and a little scary as well.

  • YouTube receives roughly 300,000 individual video uploads each day, amounting to 80k hours of video and 24TB of data.
  • 8am PST is the busiest time of day for video uploads, whereas 12:36am is the least busy. Approximately 10x more videos are uploaded during the busiest time comparing to the least busy.
  • The average video uploaded to YouTube is 15 minutes long and 86MB in size.
  • 93.5% of videos uploaded to YouTube are in English.
  • The People & Blogs category receives the highest volume of uploads, accounting for a whopping 41% of videos uploaded everyday, followed by Gaming (14%), Film & Action (10%) and Entertainment (8%).
  • Although the People & Blogs category accounts for the most video uploads each day, Gaming is king, receiving the most attention.
  • Static videos — typically spammy videos containing just a static image whose purpose is to lure people outside of YouTube — account for unbelievable 7.5% of all uploaded videos.

What happens to videos after they’re uploaded? That’s even more interesting.

  • Only 35% of all videos uploaded will be claimed by rights holders. 26% will be monitored or monetized by the copyright holder; the remainder will be taken down.
  • A whopping 32% of all videos will end up removed within the first 24 hours.
  • 5% of videos will be deleted by users.
  • 18% will be removed because the user had their account terminated.
  • 9% will be taken down due to copyright infringement.
  • 0.4% of all videos are made private by the users in the first 24 hours.
  • 5% accounts that uploads videos in any given day get terminated for violating YouTube’s TOS.
  • Terminated accounts upload around 20% of all videos every day, 6x more than a typical account.

I’m still a little leery of this data because of the big disparity from what we’ve used in the past. Although it’s enough to change my mind, I’m still looking for confirmation from another source just to be sure that music isn’t a big part of YouTube anymore.