Tag Archives for " SACEM "

Music Industry News Roundup For The Week Of 4/14/17

Music Industry News Roundup Here’s the Music Industry News Roundup for the week ending on April 14th, 2017. The news this week is varied, but interesting, with Spotify in the lead again. Let’s get into it.

Recording artists are lobbying Capitol Hill to get paid for radio airplay. This has been an ongoing struggle for a couple of decades but the NAB always wins. It might not be so easy this time.

3 Rights societies collaborate for better royalty collection. ASCAP, France’s SACEM and the U.K.’s PRS are hoping that the blockchain technology from IBM will help with better and faster worldwide collections. Blockchain has been offered as a solution by a wide array of tech startups, but having the muscle of an IBM could actually give it a chance.

Google has to change how it presents music in order to prosper. There are two destinations with Google Play and YouTube music, and that’s one too many.

Spotify might take a different route to going public. It might list its shares directly without raising any money, which gives its investors an easier way to cash out.

Jay-Z pulled his music off of Spotify and Apple Music. Then he brought it back to Apple Music. Curious, but too little too late, unfortunately. This won’t help either Jay-Z or Tidal.

Amazon is actually the world’s biggest streaming service. That’s based on the number of Prime members it has, who automatically get access. This doesn’t mean they’re actually using the service though.

Another plagiarism lawsuit catches Ed Sheeran this time. And it cost him $20 million and co-writes.

DailyMotion relaunches to try to take on YouTube. But it’s going to have a lot less user content, so it really isn’t challenging YouTube much.

Spotify is better than broadcast music radio. Well, duh. Especially with long blocks of commercials these days, radio is becoming unlistenable.

A guild for music supervisors has launched. It’s only for the UK and Europe, but can the US be far behind?

That’s the Music News Roundup of what went on in the music industry last week. Have a great week ahead!

January 18, 2017

France’s SACEM Might Have Created The Copyright Management Technology Of The Future

SACEM copyright systemFor the most part, performance rights organizations use an antiquated system to determine the payouts to their members. For radio, it all depends on a survey at certain times of the year that looks at a cross-section of what stations are playing in order to determine the royalties. For streaming, it depends on the data they get from the streaming services. There’s lots of room for error here, and that’s been a complaint over the years. France’s SACEM might have the solution though, with a new cloud-based copyright management system powered by IBM.

The system is called URights, and it uses cognitive search and content analysis technology to provide rights holders with extensive data reporting to not only track usage, but identify trends in the marketplace as well. It’s going to be launched this year, and a major requirement is that it be able to effectively track and process the billions of audio files now consumed on a daily basis around the world

SACEM is actually doing a pretty good job of that already, last year tracking over 980 billion download and streaming transactions (almost twice the previous year’s total) on behalf of its 157,000 members.

Accurate accounting is something that every artist, band and songwriter expects in this digital age of ours, and unfortunately that’s often not what’s provided. Sometimes it’s more of an “in the ballpark” estimate, other times its the accounting provided by the distributor (which history has proven can be way off), and other times it’s determined by a measurement that’s no longer as effective as it could be, given the resources that are available today.

URights is a step in the right direction, but will only serve a small portion of the world. Let’s hope that the US PROs either come up with something similar, or decide to license the SACEM technology in the near future.