Tag Archives for " Adele "

How Fan’s Video Copies Sold Adele’s “Hello”

Hello video copiesWe all know how powerful video can be when it comes to having a hit, but a recent analysis of Adele’s “Hello” by Pexeso really drives the point home that video copies play a huge part in fan awareness. The site tracked the hit song over a period of 101 days, starting on its October 22nd release date on YouTube, and found out a lot about the popularity of video on various social platforms.

  • First of all, more than 60,000 copies of “Hello” were found across eight popular social media platforms. 45% were published on YouTube, while Facebook accounted for 29% of copies, followed by Vine, which accounted for 12.9%.
  • Even though Facebook had far fewer copies published than YouTube, Facebook still garnered over 2x more video views than YouTube. According to the site, Facebook racked up an average of 73,083 views per video, whereas each YouTube video of the song amassed an average of 23,095 views per video . Vine actually ranked higher than YouTube, with an average of 49,904 views per video. Of course, as you’ve seen by my recent article on the subject, all platforms measure what a view is differently, with Facebook being particularly generous in that regard.
  • Facebook was the leader in terms of engagement though, with 41,436,124 cumulative likes and shares on all video copies, and 15,634,315 on the original. Believe it or not, Google+ came in at second place with 1,715,636 engagements on video copies and 1,496,299 on the original. While it may seem a little lopsided that copies of the song beat out the official uploaded song, remember that there were far more user-generated copies available. One thing here that was surprising is that copies of the music video received over 2.5x more engagement than the source video over the course of the survey.
  • Speaking of copies, the official video was copied and uploaded extremely fast. It took just 2 minutes and 7 seconds after “Hello’s” music video was published to Adele’s VEVO channel on YouTube for the first copy to appear on Facebook. It took slightly longer  for YouTube, at 3 minutes and 12 seconds later. 18 minutes and 48 seconds after its initial release, the first Vine clip of “Hello” surfaced.
  • Despite all you hear about YouTube and the record labels being tough on piracy, only 16.9%  of the 60,055 copies of “Hello” that were located were removed via takedown request. 36% of those takedowns came via YouTube, but they accounted for only 13% of the 27,033 total copies published to the site.

This is indeed a strange new video world we live in that’s asymmetrical in nature. It can’t be assumed that the results on one platform will be matched by another, or that one is better than another. One thing’s for sure, if the fans like your song or music video, it will for sure make it’s way onto every available social platform available.

[photograph: Egghead06 via Wikipedia]

Music Industry News Roundup #2

Music Industry News Roundup It appears that Music 3.0 blog readers liked the News Roundup concept, so here’s the second addition, although it’s a bit abbreviated because of the July 4th holiday.

Google Play offers 4 free months. If you’re a brand new subscriber, you can get Google Play and YouTube Red bundled together for what amounts to $40 value for a free trial. There is a catch though. If you’ve ever been a subscriber, even for a free trial, you’re not eligible.

How well is YouTube Red doing? Much better than you think, according to analyst Mark Mulligan. He says it’s reaching between 5 and 10% month over month growth, and there’s an appetite for the service, especially in the U.S. That said, it’s still only reaching slightly less than 90% of the current YouTube users, so some aggressive marketing is needed.

YouTube Red is going cheap. As a result, Red is trying to drum up business with a $0.99 for 3 months. The catch? The Christmas holiday season doesn’t apply. These 3 articles show that Google/YouTube is starting to get more aggressive in the marketplace, which will affect both Spotify and Apple Music. Price war, anyone?

People still refuse to pay for music. According to a BPI Briefing study, 2/3rds of adult Internet users stream music at least once a month. The bad news? Only 1 in 10 are willing to pay for it. Most surprising? It’s people between 16 and 24 that are more likely to pay for it.

Facebook changes its Newsfeed again. Everyone but consumers seem to be up in arms about Facebook’s new Newsfeed algorithm. The new one places more emphasis on posts from family and friends first, and posts that entertain and inform second. Ads and commercials come in last.

When music becomes more popular faster. An interesting article on Poly-Graph shows how there have been more music videos that exceed a billion views recently. How much so? Out of the 17 that have passed a billion, 15 have come in the last year. Adele’s “Hello” made it in only 87 days!

Automated rights might not be the way to go. Anti-piracy firm Rightscorp is questioning its own viability after some dismal first-quarter financial results. The company is hired by record labels and publishers to collect money from copyright infringers, but the pirates are either getting better at it, or it maybe piracy just isn’t as bad as it used to be.

The Consent Decree still stands. What may be the biggest story of last week, the U.S. Department of Justice refused to change what’s known as the Consent Decree. Music publishers want to be allowed to negotiate their US digital rights outside of the blanket licences offered by ASCAP and BMI, but the DoJ ruled against it. What more, the DoJ ruled that both ASCAP and BMI must accept 100% licensing – meaning that if a licensee clears a track with one writer, it doesn’t need to bother doing so with his or her co-writers or co-publishers. Publishers and songwriters aren’t happy, to say the least.

That’s the News Roundup of what went on in the music industry last week. Let’s see what this has brings.

Old Music Outsells New In 2015

Old Music outsells new musicNielsen’s latest music report is out and, as always, it’s very revealing about what we listen to in the U.S. Perhaps it’s biggest revelation is that, for the first time, old music (known as catalog sales) outsold new music in 2015.

Catalog is defined as a music release that’s more than 18 months old. Of course, we’re also talking about music sales and not streams, which is an entirely different matter.

That said, sales of older music came despite the huge sales numbers for Adele’s giant 25 album, which was only available for sale and not as a stream. The album went on to sell 7.2 million copies in the last 6 weeks of 2015 in the U.S. alone.

But lest you think that CDs are completely dead, 2015 saw 125 million of them sold for about $1.52 billion in revenue, which is still a huge amount of money.

And that’s only the CDs that were tallied by Soundscan. CDs sold privately on events and online aren’t counted.

Beyond that, there were 103 million digital albums downloaded, and 11.9 million vinyl albums sold.

As you can see on the chart on the left, catalog music leads over new music in all facets of sales. I guess the “Long Tail Theory” must be working.